Gardening 101 ~How-to Plant Raspberries and Care For Them!

“Maybe a person’s time would be as well spent raising food as raising money to buy food.“ ― Frank A Clark

Over the years I have grown just about everything possible for my growing zone with the exception of fruit trees. I’ve had an apple tree, but I dare not say I am an expert in this field of horticulture. 

My specialty has always been heirloom varieties of fruits and vegetables, with a focus on tomatoes and lettuces.

I often talk about my childhood and growing up with my grandmother and mother in the kitchen and our gardens. They are very fond memories that I truly love to share. We always had a beautiful, well kept little vegetable garden in our backyard, which included both raspberries and strawberries. My grandmother never grew blueberries though. She said they took up too much space. Space she didn’t have to give up.

I have personally grown all of these delicious fruits and today I’m going to touch on raspberries. If you missed last week’s blog post on How-to Grow Grapes & Care for Them, check that out as well!

If you are looking to add some delicious and nutritious berries to your garden, then look no further than raspberries! These juicy, sweet berries are easier to grow and care for than you may think that many home gardeners enjoy in their gardens.

In today’s blog post, I will walk you through all the tips & tricks you’ll need to know about planting raspberries, from choosing the right variety and caring for your new berry bushes. We’ll cover all the basics, including when and where to plant, how to space your plants, and what kind of soil and nutrients your raspberries will need to thrive. So whether you’re a novice or die hard gardener, read on to learn how to grow your own delicious raspberries and enjoy fresh, sweet berries all summer long!

Let’s get planting those raspberries!

What Variety of Raspberry Should I Choose?

Before you start planting raspberries, it’s important to choose the right variety for your garden. There are two main types of raspberries: summer-bearing and everbearing. Summer-bearing raspberries produce one large crop in early summer, while everbearing raspberries produce a smaller crop in early summer and a second, smaller crop in fall.

When choosing a raspberry variety, consider your climate and growing conditions. Some varieties do better in certain areas than others. For example, some varieties of raspberries are more cold-hardy than others and can withstand harsh winter conditions. Other varieties are more resistant to certain pests and diseases.

Here are some popular raspberry varieties to consider:

Heritage: A popular variety of everbearing raspberries that produces sweet, juicy berries. Heritage raspberries are hardy and disease-resistant, making them a good choice for gardeners in colder climates.

Caroline: Another popular everbearing variety, Caroline raspberries are known for their large, firm berries and disease resistance.

Tulameen: A popular summer-bearing raspberry variety, Tulameen raspberries are known for their large, sweet berries and high yield.

When and where do I  plant my raspberries?

Raspberries should be planted in early spring or fall, when the soil is cool and moist. Planting in the heat of summer can stress the plants and make it harder for them to establish roots. When choosing a location for your raspberry bushes, look for a spot that gets at least six hours of sun per day and has well-draining soil.

It’s also important to choose a location that is free from competing plants and weeds. Raspberries can be quite aggressive and will quickly spread and take over an area if not properly maintained.

Planting raspberries – Step by Step Guide

Once you’ve chosen your raspberry variety and prepared your soil, it’s time to plant your bushes.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting raspberries:

  1. Dig a hole that is slightly larger than the root ball of your raspberry plant.
  2. Place the plant in the hole and backfill with soil, making sure the crown of the plant is level with the soil surface.
  3. Tamp down the soil around the plant to remove any air pockets.
  4. Water the plant thoroughly after planting.

When planting raspberries, it’s important to space your plants properly. Raspberries should be spaced about 2-3 feet apart in rows that are 6-8 feet apart. This will give your plant

Pruning raspberry plants

Proper pruning is essential for healthy raspberry plants and good fruit production. Raspberries should be pruned twice per year: once in late winter or early spring, and again after harvest.

In late winter or early spring, prune out any dead, damaged, or diseased canes. Then, thin out any weak or spindly canes, leaving only the strongest, healthiest canes.

After harvest, prune out all of the canes that produced fruit. These canes will not produce fruit again and should be removed to make room for new growth.

Pruning raspberry plants properly is essential!

Proper pruning is essential for healthy raspberry plants and good fruit production. Raspberries should be pruned twice per year: once in late winter or early spring, and again after harvest.

In late winter or early spring, prune out any dead, damaged, or diseased canes. Then, thin out any weak or spindly canes, leaving only the strongest, healthiest canes.

After harvest, prune out all of the canes that produced fruit. These canes will not produce fruit again and should be removed to make room for new growth.

Harvesting and storing raspberries

Raspberries are ready to harvest when they are fully colored and easily detach from the plant. Harvest your raspberries in the morning, when they are cool and dry, to help prevent bruising.

Raspberries are best eaten fresh but can also be frozen or canned for later use. To freeze raspberries, simply wash and dry them, then spread them out on a baking sheet and freeze until solid. Once frozen, transfer to an airtight container or freezer bag.

Common mistakes to avoid in raspberry planting and care

When planting and caring for raspberries, there are a few common mistakes to avoid:

  1. Planting too close together: Raspberries need plenty of room to grow and should be spaced at least 2-3 feet apart.
  2. Over-fertilizing: While raspberries do need regular fertilization, too much fertilizer can lead to excessive growth and weak canes. 
  3. Pruning at the wrong time: Pruning at the wrong time of year can harm your raspberry plants and reduce fruit production.
  4. Neglecting pest and disease control: Ignoring signs of pests or disease can quickly lead to a larger problem that is harder to control.

Stayed tuned for next weeks blog post on how to plant and care for blueberries!

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Added bonus: You can go to my blog at http://www.fordragonfliesandme.com to purchase my original cookbook, Lovingly Seasoned Eats and Treats in either a spiral bound soft cover OR NEW, a Downloadable PDF version. The cookbook has almost 1000 recipes on almost 500 pages! Check out the Cookbook Testimonials while you’re there!

Until next time remember to,
Eat fresh, shop local & have a happy day,

Jean

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6 thoughts on “Gardening 101 ~How-to Plant Raspberries and Care For Them!

  1. This is good to know. We have blackberries and blueberries in our yard — mainly because those two berries are most likely to be eaten by my brood. However, we might look into adding raspberries. Thanks for the insight!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s awesome you have those! Something is better than nothing and you definitely want to keep everybody at at home happy lol. Let me know if you try and how it goes for you. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

    • They’re actually so easy to grow! They’re basically weeds lol. Wild ones won’t get as big you definitely wanna try a good cult of her. Good luck and let me know if you try.

      Like

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